No big surprise here, but the KCCNazi (Korea Communications Commission) says Facebook is violating the somewhat infamous Article 22 of the Korea’s privacy law policy.

The KCC gave Facebook 30 days to comply … about a weekish ago. So, the countdown is on.

Its unlikely that Facebook will make any dramatic concessions. Rather, Facebook will probably just implement some work-arounds or make some inconsequential service sacrifices that tends to leave the KCC huffing and puffing, but otherwise impotent to enforce punishments. Just ask Google (refuses to comply to Korean real-name law) and YouTube (scaled back for same reason). We even saw the KoreaGameNazi when Apple and Android were forced to comply Gaming Boards game app approval system.

I’m kind of split on this one. Normally, I’m admittedly shotgun blind shot against the over-regulated, out-dated, often non-sensicle, poorly implemented protectionist privacy laws (if you can’t tell), but Facebook has been many problems related to privacy issues… so its much harder to point the finger at the 500lb FB gorilla in the room.

That said, what I can add to the news (as it relates to Korea) is:

Get in line FaceBook! This is how the RoK rolls (for better or worse)!!

500+ million members isn’t why you have enemies here… TheKCCNazi was waaaay ahead of you.

 

Why stop at soup?

The guys over at Cyworld (Korea’s home grown and number 1 social network) have gotta be grinning ear-to-ear right now.

 

 

 

7 Comments

  1. […] to add, to say that it’s all going to be plain sailing for FB and Twitter. Already, FB has fallen foul of the Korea Communications Commission over privacy issues. And with FB due to set up an official […]

  2. […] to add, to say that it’s all going to be plain sailing for FB and Twitter. Already, FB has fallen foul of the Korea Communications Commission over privacy issues. And with FB due to set up an official […]

  3. January 20, 2011 at 11:56 am — Reply

    […] Though the immediate assumption might be that Twitter has no stomach for facing down Korea’s Communications Commission or its real-name registration system, the more prosaic truth may well be that for all Twitter’s […]

  4. […] Though the immediate assumption might be that Twitter has no stomach for facing down Korea’s Communications Commission or its real-name registration system, the more prosaic truth may well be that for all Twitter’s […]

  5. January 25, 2011 at 8:57 am — Reply

    […] the piece notes that Korea’s recent boom in interest for foreign SNS has prompted FB to open an office here and Twitter to start offering a Korean-language version. So, with this overwhelming mass of […]

  6. […] the piece notes that Korea’s recent boom in interest for foreign SNS has prompted FB to open an office here and Twitter to start offering a Korean-language version. So, with this overwhelming mass of […]

  7. […] the law affected all domestic Web services with 100,000 daily visitors or more.  YouTube, Facebook and at least 150 other sites were ordered  to ensure that all commenting users provided their […]

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